Category Archives: Leadership

How Solving Conflict Boosts Management Skill Set – Part 4 of 4

Start building new management skills in conflict management

Self-awareness is one of the most important management skills there is. Self-awareness is the first step to diffusing conflict. Think about your style of managing conflict. Do you avoid? Acquiesce? Compete? Compromise? Collaborate? 

Which one of these styles do you perceive to have the most value? And given that, which one will you begin to practice more and more?

What else can you do to boost your self awareness and in turn your management skill set?  Try reflective activities, talking to open-minded colleagues, and reading books that guide you towards more awareness.

For more resources about how to increase your management skills through management training, managing change, or free reports on building team effectiveness, visit our website at  
http://www.managementtraininginstitute.com or learn about management training at 
https://www.boldnewdirections.com

 

Adapted from Managing From The Inside Out by Jim Hornickel, Director Training and Development, Bold New Directions

 

 

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Is Conflict Management An Essential Management Skill? – Part 3 of 4

This is part 3 of the 4 part series on Conflict Management & how is it an essential management skill.  One of the important steps in conflice management is to Identify the true source of the conflict. 

When you are feeling in a calmer and more objective frame of mind, turn your attention to identifying the source of the conflict. Most of the time you’ll find that the topic of disagreement belongs in one of four main areas:

A. Power struggles based on ego: Some people respond to the demands of their egos by needing to have and exert power. Don’t take it personally. Accept that this is their story and it’s not about you. By disentangling yourself from someone else’s emotional needs, you’ll be able to listen more objectively to what they have to say. You might even feel centered enough to respond to the other person with empathy. While this is not easy to do (and takes practice), responding with acceptance and understanding may encourage the other person to set aside their ego and join with you to solve the conflict. Through management training, participants get the opportunity to learn and practice these types of new responses to conflict.

B. Poor Communication
Communication is deeply influenced by factors like language, gender, culture, age, skills, personal experience, etc. With so many distinctive ways of communicating, it is inevitable that conflicts will arise due to misunderstandings in communication. An essential cornerstone to all our management training seminars is practicing and learning effective communication skills.

To raise the level of your management skills, always be aware of the challenges of communication and how easy it is for us to misunderstand one another. When addressing a disagreement with another party(s), be sure to ask yourself what you would like to get from the discussion. Then ask the other party(s) what they want to get from it. Be aware of your assumptions and check them out. Exercise great curiosity about what the other person wants to communicate. Be that person’s ally and you both will benefit from your good intentions to bridge communication gaps.

C. Personality Differences
How many times have we been miffed at someone because they seemed just too different from us? When personality differences produce conflict it would be worth your while to invest some time and a little money in searching out a personality or behavioral styles assessment. There are many, including the well-known Myers Briggs Personality Type Indicator. The basic benefit of these inventories is the reminder that people differ in how they approach life. These assessments help people understand their own personality styles and how they can work with co-workers whose personalities and temperaments are naturally different from their own.

D. Differing Needs – (What’s in it for me?)
“What’s in it for me?” is a question that each of us naturally asks ourselves consciously or unconsciously. In our management training seminars we stress that, as managers, we must be aware that there are always needs in the picture or at stake. When there appear to be differing or opposing needs, first look to define what those needs are; what do you or the other/s truly want? Then, look to see what strategy options there are. Brainstorm until you run dry! Be extra creative! And negotiate from an attitude of win-win. Actively look for ways that will bring each of you more of what you want. If it feels like too much of a compromise is going on, step back and look for options that will bring greater mutual satisfaction.

Watch for Part 4 in this series on Management Skills and Conflict Management.  For more resources about how to increase your management skills through management training, managing change, or free reports on building team effectiveness, visit our website at: http://www.managementtraininginstitute.com or learn about management training at https://www.boldnewdirections.com.

 

Adapted from Managing From The Inside Out by Jim Hornickel, Director Training and Development, Bold New Directions

 

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How is Conflict Management An Essential Management Skill? – Part 2 of 4

This is Part 2 of a 4 Part Series on how conflict management is an essential management skill.  If you do not feel confident in your conflict management skills, take heart.  Conflict management can be learned through management skill training courses.  An essential element involves increasing your self awareness as a key step in preventing and decreasing conflict. 

One of the most important managements skills: self-awareness

Many of us become riled up when faced with a conflict. You may already have discovered that when emotion takes over, whatever actually triggered the conflict tends to get lost in the commotion. High Emotion=Low Intelligence! In our management training seminars participants learn that self-awareness is the first step toward de-escalating conflict. If you are facing a conflict, notice if you are beginning to feel emotionally overwhelmed or angry. If so, be honest with yourself about your feelings. Then take the time you need to calm and center yourself.  Make improved self awareness a goal.  Read books, write in a journal, reflect, talk to others – all these tools will grow your self awareness and your conflict management capacity.  And that in turn will enhance your ability as a manager. 

Join us for parts 3 and 4 of this series on Conflict Management  – An essential management skill.

For more resources about how to increase your management skills through management training, managing change, or free reports on building team effectiveness, visit our website at: http://www.managementtraininginstitute.com or learn about management training at https://www.boldnewdirections.com.

 Adapted from Managing From The Inside Out by Jim Hornickel, Director Training and Development, Bold New Directions

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Conflict Management – An Essential Management Skill – part 1 of 4 part series

Conflict Management: one of the most essential management skills

 

As managers we know that, for good or for bad, conflict is part of the workplace. On the good side, it sometimes takes an outright conflict to uncover a problem that’s been simmering beneath the surface perhaps for some time. While most of us would rather acknowledge problems in more thoughtful and intentional ways, an outburst or confrontation may force us to face a problem squarely and find a solution.

1) To manage conflict successfully encourage empathy and openness to others’ views

Often, however, conflict means that people who disagree get stuck in a mind-set of “I’m right and your wrong”. Rigidly holding to a view that prevents us from trying to understand someone else’s perspective can result in continuing and disruptive conflict.

Successfully resolving conflict calls for dedication from all sides to find a resolution that meets some, if not all, the needs of everyone involved. To understand those needs, we need to give up rigidly adhering to a single view, and be willing to explore other people’s perspectives with empathy and openness. In our management training seminars, participants practice management skills to help themselves and others avoid inflexible attitudes and to listen to each other with curiosity and a receptive frame of mind.

For more resources about how to increase your management skills through management training, managing change, or free reports on building team effectiveness, visit our website at: http://www.managementtraininginstitute.com or learn about management training at https://www.boldnewdirections.com.

 

Adapted from Managing From The Inside Out by Jim Hornickel, Director Training and Development, Bold New Directions

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Curiosity As a Key Management Skill – Part 1 of 4 Part Series

At Bold New Directions our management training teaches managers to lead with curiosity. If you’re like most managers and leaders you’ve progressed to where you are, in part, because you have a strong sense of curiosity. You’re curious about how to solve problems, how to motivate your staff, how to improve operations and productivity. Many leaders, however, don’t think of their innate curiosity as a tool to help them lead. In our management training programs we focus on the positive effects of curiosity, and how managers can consciously use their genuine curiosity to improve their management skills.

 

As a manager, curiosity benefits you in several ways. Over the course of the next few weeks we will explore Curiosity in this 4 Part Series.  Curiosity puts wonder into our lives. Eagerness, inquiring mind, inquisitiveness, interest, investigation, questioning, searching, thirst for knowledge: all common names for curiosity.  By being curious life becomes an adventure. Being curious about the old and familiar can reveal exciting, new perspectives; and wondering what’s around the corner or beyond the bend leads to exploration and discovery.While curiosity makes every aspect of our lives more exciting and vital, in our management training programs we share examples of how curiosity has helped to raise management skills.

 

Karen recently joined a new company as a manager. Not everything had gone smoothly since she started. For one thing, she was not that excited about the team she was leading (nor they about her), and she wondered if there was a way for her to become more consciously engaged with them.

Karen is proud of her management skills; she’s a mindful person and an aware manager She decided to remember back to times in her life when she was excited or engaged. What were the qualities of those interactions that held her interest? As Karen recalled situation after situation from her past, she saw that the most vibrant times were when she was deeply curious. Instead of approaching someone or something with preconceived opinions, she’d been open to discovering with fresh eyes, a fresh mind, and a fresh heart.

After coming to the conclusion that curiosity would be a great ally for harmoniously working with her team members, Karen made a commitment to interact and relate to them – not from a state of dislike or judgment – but rather with healthy curiosity. She wondered what she would learn about her team and about herself.

And she was deeply curious about what she could learn from her staff about the operations she was there to manage – What was going well and why? Where were the problems and what ideas did her team members have for solutions? She realized that her spirit of curiosity could lead to her to feeling excited about the challenges of her work and to feeling engaged with her team. It was time to start asking questions.

 

For More Information About Growing Your Management Skills

For more resources about management skills training, managing change, or building team effectiveness, visit our website at: http://www.managementtraininginstitute.com or learn about management training at https://www.boldnewdirections.com . Or stay tuned to read parts 2 & 3 & 4 of this Series on Improving Your Management Skills through Curiosity.   

Adapted from the book entitled Managing From The Inside Out written by Jim Hornickel, edited by Suzanne Guthrie, available at http://www.managementtraininginstitute.com

 

 

 

 

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Improve Management Skills through Acceptance – Part 3 of 3 Articles

Open to boosting your management skills?  Explore the third step in the process through this article on how acceptance leads to positive outcomes. This is part 3 of a 3 part series on how to improve your management skills through the practice of acceptance.

Recognize that acceptance leads to positive change

 

Acceptance is not a matter of sugarcoating the truth. Insincerity is almost always easy to detect. And the fact is that many of us can accept that something went awry, be told that directly, and move forward to solve the problem. But many, if not most people, thrive on acceptance first, and then moving toward improvement after. The question is, what works best for those in your sphere of influence?

 

Practice acceptance and improve your management skills by asking yourself these questions:

  • How often do I judge a day?
  • How many times do I blame others?
  • How many times does my own ego blame me each day?
  • How do people around me respond when I accept them as they are/do not accept them as they are?
  • How will managing from acceptance impact my team’s morale, productivity and profitability?

  

For More Information About Growing Your Management Skills

 

For more resources about management skills training, managing change, or building team effectiveness, visit our website at: http://www.managementtraininginstitute.com or learn about management training at https://www.boldnewdirections.com . Or go back and read all three parts of the 3 Part Series on Improving Your Management Skills Through Acceptance.

 Adapted from the book entitled Managing From The Inside Out by Jim Hornickel and available at http://www.managementtraininginstitute.com

 

 

 

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Improve Management Skills By Practicing Acceptance – Part 1 of 3 Part Series

 

One of the greatest gifts a manager or leader can give to other people is to accept them for who they are. You can actually increase your management skills by increasing your acceptance of others. When we feel accepted, we feel good about ourselves and freer to bring our most positive, confident and creative selves to the work team.

  

 

Step 1: Don?t let ego get in the way of accepting others

 

For most managers, the problem is that at work and in the rest of our lives, ego can get in the way. On one hand, the act of acceptance is simple. What is, is! An apple is an apple. A cloud is a cloud. No brainers, right? But when it comes to us humans, it?s more difficult simply to accept what is without adding on layers of meanings, viewpoints, judgments, opinions, interpretations, etc. For example, let?s say that my friend Joan never remembers my birthday. How I feel about Joan, our relationship, or even about my own self-esteem may depend on what story I tell myself about Joan and the fact that she forgets my birthdays. My ego may pipe up and say, ?Oh, that Joan is so thoughtless!? ?She?s so stingy.? ?I?m not getting her a present if she doesn?t get me one.? But if I?m able to put my ego and my judgments on hold, I can accept that giving me a birthday present just isn?t Joan?s thing. Acceptance gives me the freedom to respond to what is without getting stuck by my egoistic views about how I think things should be. In management, the skill of managing your ego is highly valuable as it impacts your relationships with your staff.

For More Information About Growing Your Management Skills

 

For more resources about management skills training, managing change, or building team effectiveness, visit our website at: http://www.managementtraininginstitute.com or learn about management training at https://www.boldnewdirections.com . Or stay tuned to read parts 2 & 3 of this 3 Part Series on Improving Your Management Skills Through Acceptance.

 

 

Adapted from the book entitle Managing From The Inside Out by Jim Hornickel and available at http://www.managementtraininginstitute.com

 

 

 

 

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http://www.managementtraininginstitute.com

Effective Management During Organizational Change – Part 1 of 3 Part Series on Management Skills

3 Skills for Effective Management During Organizational Change

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It is a rare company that has not weathered some type of organizational change. In fact in recent decades mergers and other forms of restructuring have become almost expected in large companies. However common, these types of organizational changes can lead to confusion, uncertainty and demoralization. By recognizing staff’s need for reassurance, information, and direction, a savvy management team can successfully navigate these potentially stormy times with skill and finesse. Make sure that your management team follows the three steps outlined below.  The following three step approach to managing organizational change is a powerful tool. This series includes 3 seperate articles on managing change: sharing a new vision, keeping communication channels open, and clarifying roles for the new organization.  Let’s get started with step one. 

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Step 1. Create & Share A New Vision

It is imperative to create and convey a constructive vision of the change and how it will impact the entire organization. Depending upon the size of the company, visioning may occur at a board level, a management level, or (in an interactive fashion) with key staff members. The organizational culture may also define the type of input that is most effective for the visioning process. For example, top down organizations will clarify vision before sharing with staff whereas more consensus based organization’s (e.g. non-profits) will likely set up sessions for gathering and discussing staff input. While it is valuable to gain staff input and feedback, the main issue is often timeliness. When an organization is undergoing profound change, the sooner the new vision is communicated the better! Like a ship without a rudder, an organization without vision will soon flounder on the shoals. Savvy managers know the value of quickly agreeing upon organizational vision, stating it in understandable terms and sharing it via multiple forums. These forums can include meetings, teleconferences, emails, newsletters, and written collateral. Reinforcing the new vision during follow-up communications is essential as it may require multiple messages over time to help staff understand the new organization.

Watch for the next articles in this series to learn more about how to handle organizational change effectively. For more resources about management skills, managing change, or building team effectiveness, visit our website at: http://www.managementtraininginstitute.com or visit our partner site at https://www.boldnewdirections.com to look at management training options.

 

 

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http://www.managementtraininginstitute.com

3 Skills for Effective Management During Organizational Change

It is a rare company that has not weathered some type of organizational change. In fact in recent decades mergers and other forms of restructuring have become almost expected in large companies. However common, these types of organizational changes can lead to confusion, uncertainty and demoralization. By recognizing staff’s need for reassurance, information, and direction, a savvy management team can successfully navigate these potentially stormy times with skill and finesse.

The following three step approach to managing organizational change is a powerful tool. This article will explore the three steps for creating & sharing a new vision, keeping communication channels open, and clarifying roles for the new organization.

 

Step 1. Create & Share A New Vision

It is imperative to create and convey a constructive vision of the change and how it will impact the entire organization. Depending upon the size of the company, visioning may occur at a board level, a management level, or (in an interactive fashion) with key staff members. The organizational culture may also define the type of input that is most effective for the visioning process. For example, top down organizations will clarify vision before sharing with staff whereas more consensus based organization’s (e.g. non-profits) will likely set up sessions for gathering and discussing staff input. While it is valuable to gain staff input and feedback, the main issue is often timeliness. When an organization is undergoing profound change, the sooner the new vision is communicated the better! Like a ship without a rudder, an organization without vision will soon flounder on the shoals. Savvy managers know the value of quickly agreeing upon organizational vision, stating it in understandable terms and sharing it via multiple forums. These forums can include meetings, teleconferences, emails, newsletters, and written collateral. Reinforcing the new vision during follow-up communications is essential as it may require multiple messages over time to help staff understand the new organization.

 

Step 2: Keep Communication Channels Open

Once the organizational vision has been communicated, management teams need to set up channels for ensuring ongoing two-way communication with teams and individuals. If staff meetings are already a valued communication strategy, ensure that they are regularly scheduled for weeks and even months after the organizational change is announced. Additionally, it will be valuable for managers to arrange for other communication opportunities including face to face meetings with staff, teleconference sessions, web conferences and more. Staff will have key insights about potential roadblocks to implementing the vision and these need to be considered and planned for in conjunction with team members. By being open to challenges, and also inviting staff to brainstorm solutions, management teams will gain support for implementing the new vision.

 

Step 3: Clarify Roles That Fit The New Organization

Equally important to clarifying organizational vision, is clarifying individual vision. What should each staff member do to support the organization? How does their work support the overall vision? If significant shifts have occurred new teams and roles may need to be defined. Some roles may no longer be needed. The role clarification process can serve as a time of renewal as staff with key skill sets may be utilized in new ways. Bottom line, each member of the organization should be able to articulate how their work will support the overall vision of the company, and in turn, how they can support others in their staff team. Again, open and ongoing communication is essential as role clarification often occurs over time. While broad brush strokes are required immediately upon organizational change, details of roles may not get filled in for several months as the change unfolds within the organization. Savvy managers can create processes that enable staff and teams to discuss, shape and refine roles as time goes by.

By keeping these three steps in mind and involving staff teams in part step of the process, management teams can reduce confusion, uncertainty and helplessness. Moreover, by getting employees on board with the new vision, communicating regularly, and involving them in role clarification processes, organizations can optimize staff skillsets and organizational potential in changing times.

For more resources about management skills training, managing change, or free reports on building team effectiveness, visit our website at: http://www.managementtraininginstitute.com today.  You can also visit us at our parent site https://www.boldnewdirections.com to see our book called Managing From The Inside Out: 16 Pathways to Build Positive Relationships With Staff.