Category Archives: Communication

Improve your Zoom Presentations

In the era of remote work, do you find yourself  delivering informal presentations using Zoom? Are you frequently presenting while sitting down versus standing up? Wonder how to highlight key points while using a virtual platform?  Not sure what to do with your vocals when delivering over phone or virtual platform like Zoom? These questions are frequently asked of our expert Presentation Facilitators when we work with companies to grow their teams’ public speaking skills.

During these days of remote or hybrid workplaces, many professionals deliver presentations via zoom, webinars, or in small meeting rooms where sitting down makes more sense. So how do the stand-up delivery skills work in these sit-in situations? Turns out that all the speaking skills that are traditionally used in a stand-up forum are transferable to a seated speaking engagement such as Zoom, with some adjustments. For example, eye contact is just as important sitting down as standing up; even more so when you are in a small intimate meeting space. So use your eyes to connect briefly with each person around the room or around your screen. Similarly, gestures are important for stressing key points, and changing the pacing of your verbal remarks. While your gestures may be smaller in a screen, the same principles of delivery are important to consider. Think about your timing, your gesture zone, and your placement of your hands. keeping your gestures above a meeting room table is key to ensuring people “see” your message.

What about your vocals? Think you can forget about varying your pitch, your pace, your projection or your passion? Definitely not; a boring, monotone presentation is killer especially if you are speaking via zoom or another virtual platform or teleconference. So remember the importance of varying your vocals, changing your pitch, adjusting your projection and emphasizing key words while seated. It will be the difference between a mediocre presentation and a great one!

Bottom line, if you deliver presentations seated or standing up, it is extremely valuable to learn how to use expert performance skills such as eye contact, vocals, body language and gestures. Check out our Powerful Presentations training course for a good overview of speaking skills that deliver – whether you’re sitting down or standing up, and whether it’s a live presentation or one delivered via virtual platform.

Better Your Negotiation Skills

Negotiation is a skill that everyone uses in their lives.  It is used in the workplace as well as in our personal lives.  Whether we are aware of it or not, most of us spend a significant amount of time negotiating various issues.  That’s why it is so important to have strong negotiation skills.  Being a good negotiator allows you to build, maintain, and improve relationships in your personal life and in the workplace.  People with strong negotiation skills are oftentimes more efficient, more organized, and more successful.  The following examples display times when good negotiation skills are a must.  Let’s take a look at a few places where the ability to negotiate can help you succeed.

 

During an Interview

While it is certainly impressive to have a resume packed with experience, it is more about what you say in an interview that will determine whether or not you get the job.  Statistics show that many hiring decisions are actually made in the first 2 minutes of an interview.  For this reason, it is important that candidates be able to come in with strong negotiation skills.  Before leaving an interview you should negotiate a follow-up call or stopping by in the near future to check in.  Utilizing these negotiation skills will show confidence and help you avoid getting lost in the paperwork.

 

In the Workplace

Most people think that the essential skills needed to get ahead in the workplace are hard work, good communication, and good luck.  While these are obviously very important, another component that is often overlooked is the ability to negotiate.  Negotiation involves the ability to recognize and capitalize on opportunities.  When you are capable of closing the deal for your company, you are opening the door to bigger opportunities for yourself. Strengthening your negotiation skills makes you an asset to your company and helps you accomplish your personal goals.

 

In a Performance Review

Most professionals are given an annual performance review.  This is the perfect opportunity to use your negotiation skills to get what you want: a higher salary, more benefits, a promotion.  An employee who can negotiate well knows how to showcase their talents in order to further their career.  Aside from salary and benefits, a good negotiator would also negotiate for the tools needed to grow and thrive in their position.  These tools could include a strong support staff, special training, or a new job title.  Knowing how and when to negotiate can help you advance your career and professional growth.

 

Being a good negotiator is an important part of being successful both personally and professionally.  Good negotiation skills help you to achieve important goals for yourself and your organization.  While these were just a few examples of places where negotiation is important, it is an invaluable skill that will help you in nearly every aspect of your life. Take a look at our training programs at https://www.boldnewdirections.com or visit our site http://www.negotiationstraininginstitute.com to learn more.

Why is the Title Important?

What’s in a title? Attraction! Interest! Engagement! You have a fairly vast subject to present. And everything leads to everything. At our presentation training events, you begin to understand that you old method of approaching presentations, data dumping, is death to the audience.

Your audience is like all humans these days; busier than busy. “Why should I spend my precious time with you?” they ask (subliminally). You better have a clear and solid answer if you want to capture their attention; if you want to be a success.  Presentation training will help you structure a strong message and hook their attention. We will teach you about the 4 A’s – a technique for engagement.

How is your presentation title?  In just 3-5 words, you are setting the direction of your short time together. You are giving them the ‘what’. But they also need the ‘why’.  Why will their time with you bring THEM more success?  A Presentation Training seminar can help you understand this hook.

So brainstorm titles. Have fun with it. Come up with at least five to choose from. Which one jumps out at you that will jump out at them as being a topic that they can’t do without?

 

Improve Presentation Skills With Training on Pause & Projection – Part 2

Pause

Pause involves stopping momentarily for effect in the middle of your remarks. It is a tool that is used hand in hand with variation of Pace. A pause is best used before or after a significant point as a tool for emphasis. Pause is also a tremendous tool for nervous speakers who tend to speak too fast. By stopping at key points, the speaker allows the audience time to process key points before moving on to new material. One easy trick is to underline key points in your notes and then place the word PAUSE in large letters to remind you to stop speaking for a few seconds. Actively playing with pause will have a profound effect on your presentation prowess. Now that we have covered Pause let’s move on to the powerful tool of Projection.

Projection

This aspect of voice is by far the most important as it correlates to your audience’s ability to hear your remarks. Even the most intelligent presenter can not have their desired impact if the people in the room can not hear their key points. With projection, everyone can hear your comments without having to strain their voice. However, there is still value in varying your projection to add intrigue and interest to your comments. For example, you might want to soften your voice to emphasize a key point and then later increase the volume for another point. In either case you must ensure that all members of the audience can hear each and every point. Practice projecting your voice by imagining that everyone is sitting against the far wall in the room. Ensure they can hear you and that you are speaking from your diaphragm.

Now that we have discussed Pause & Projection keep a look out for part 3 of this series which focusses on how to improve presentation skills through practice, coaching and training.  If you are looking for free resources you can visit us at http://www.presentationtraininginstitute.com or visit us at https://www.boldnewdirections.com

For More Information About Presentation Training Institute

If you would like to learn more about the Presentation Training Institute, and its parent company Bold New Directions,  please visit us and view our free resources at http://www.presentationtraininginstitute.com or  at https://www.boldnewdirections.com

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Improve Presentation Skills With Training On Pitch & Pace

Voice is a powerful tool for presenters. Voice can make all the difference between success and failure when you’re wanting to fully engage your audience. In sales meetings, company updates or technical meetings, it is critical to keep your audience involved and interested in your remarks. Learn how to stretch your voice by understanding the 5 P’s of Voice Control including Pitch, Pace, Pause, Projection & Personality.  We’ll explore the many aspects of voice and its impact on presentation skills in this three part series.  

Pitch

Pitch refers to the ups and downs of your notes when you speak. We all have the ability to speak from a vocal range – which includes higher notes and lower notes. However, it takes great awareness and practice to notice your own pitch and to change it consciously. Why is pitch important? A monotone voice bores the audience and a bored audience is less likely to recall your key points or to take action. To play around with pitch try thinking of popular characters who have voices at either end of the vocal range then practice speaking (or singing!) like them. For example you might think of Michael Jackson’s high pitched voice and then compare it with Barry White’s deeper tones. You can also simulate the voices of movie actors to start expanding your own range. Over time your awareness and practice with pitch will enable you to vary your voice as you speak – all in the aim of drawing your audience into your remarks. Now that we’ve looked at Pitch, let’s move on to Pace.

Pace

Pace refers to the speed at which you speak. Just as monotone is boring so is mono-pace. A good speaker knows the value of changing the pace as they speak. For example, when you are introducing a topic that is exciting you can speed up the pace of your voice. On the other hand, when you want people to focus their attention you may slow down for emphasis. The overall point is that variation is the key to success here. So play around with your pace next time you speak to see the impact on your audience. Now that we have explored Pace look for the next article in the series that will look at Pause.  See our website at http://www.presentationtraininginstitute.com for more information or see our main site at https://www.boldnewdirections.com for free tools to improve your presentation skills and overall impact.

For More Information About Improving Presentation Skills

If you’re looking to boost your presentation skills through coaching or training look at our website at http://www.presentationtraininginstitute.com for information and free resources.  Want to download a free report on overall communication skills?  Visit our main site at https://www.boldnewdirections.com 

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