Monthly Archives: August 2013

Improve Management Skills through Acceptance – Part 3 of 3 Articles

Open to boosting your management skills?  Explore the third step in the process through this article on how acceptance leads to positive outcomes. This is part 3 of a 3 part series on how to improve your management skills through the practice of acceptance.

Recognize that acceptance leads to positive change

 

Acceptance is not a matter of sugarcoating the truth. Insincerity is almost always easy to detect. And the fact is that many of us can accept that something went awry, be told that directly, and move forward to solve the problem. But many, if not most people, thrive on acceptance first, and then moving toward improvement after. The question is, what works best for those in your sphere of influence?

 

Practice acceptance and improve your management skills by asking yourself these questions:

  • How often do I judge a day?
  • How many times do I blame others?
  • How many times does my own ego blame me each day?
  • How do people around me respond when I accept them as they are/do not accept them as they are?
  • How will managing from acceptance impact my team’s morale, productivity and profitability?

  

For More Information About Growing Your Management Skills

 

For more resources about management skills training, managing change, or building team effectiveness, visit our website at: http://www.managementtraininginstitute.com or learn about management training at https://www.boldnewdirections.com . Or go back and read all three parts of the 3 Part Series on Improving Your Management Skills Through Acceptance.

 Adapted from the book entitled Managing From The Inside Out by Jim Hornickel and available at http://www.managementtraininginstitute.com

 

 

 

Source url :
http://www.managementtraininginstitute.com

Improve Management Skills By Practicing Acceptance – Part 1 of 3 Part Series

 

One of the greatest gifts a manager or leader can give to other people is to accept them for who they are. You can actually increase your management skills by increasing your acceptance of others. When we feel accepted, we feel good about ourselves and freer to bring our most positive, confident and creative selves to the work team.

  

 

Step 1: Don?t let ego get in the way of accepting others

 

For most managers, the problem is that at work and in the rest of our lives, ego can get in the way. On one hand, the act of acceptance is simple. What is, is! An apple is an apple. A cloud is a cloud. No brainers, right? But when it comes to us humans, it?s more difficult simply to accept what is without adding on layers of meanings, viewpoints, judgments, opinions, interpretations, etc. For example, let?s say that my friend Joan never remembers my birthday. How I feel about Joan, our relationship, or even about my own self-esteem may depend on what story I tell myself about Joan and the fact that she forgets my birthdays. My ego may pipe up and say, ?Oh, that Joan is so thoughtless!? ?She?s so stingy.? ?I?m not getting her a present if she doesn?t get me one.? But if I?m able to put my ego and my judgments on hold, I can accept that giving me a birthday present just isn?t Joan?s thing. Acceptance gives me the freedom to respond to what is without getting stuck by my egoistic views about how I think things should be. In management, the skill of managing your ego is highly valuable as it impacts your relationships with your staff.

For More Information About Growing Your Management Skills

 

For more resources about management skills training, managing change, or building team effectiveness, visit our website at: http://www.managementtraininginstitute.com or learn about management training at https://www.boldnewdirections.com . Or stay tuned to read parts 2 & 3 of this 3 Part Series on Improving Your Management Skills Through Acceptance.

 

 

Adapted from the book entitle Managing From The Inside Out by Jim Hornickel and available at http://www.managementtraininginstitute.com

 

 

 

 

Source url :
http://www.managementtraininginstitute.com

Take a Solution Oriented Approach in Presentation Skills – Part 2 of 2

Let’s see how the W4H1 Approach Works to bring solutions to your audience in your next presentation.

For example, let’s say that you were talking to a group of professionals who were concerned about upcoming layoffs. After first tapping into the pain and anguish this is undoubtedly producing in a group of staff, you could discuss how you successfully prepared for and transitioned through a lay off experience by starting your own consulting business. Let’s look at the W4H1 approach and how it would apply to this example of starting a consulting business. Notice that the questions are also written in an audience focused manner by dealing with what THEY can do, rather than a pure history of what YOU yourself did.

 

– What Can You Do?

 – Where Can You Find Customers?

 – When Should You Start Your Business?

 – Why Promote Your Services?

 – How Can You Promote Your Services?

 

By answering each of these questions in a clear and concise manner you are directing your audience to solution oriented steps that they can take to resolve their issue. Your audience will thank you for not only connecting with their dilemma, but for explicitly helping them to understand a solution and take action! Still not sure how to get started? Visit us at https://www.boldnewdirections.com or at http://www.presentationtraininginstitute.com for more tips and tools.

 For more information on how to communicate with your audience visit our website at https://www.boldnewdirections.com where you will learn about presentation skills training, business communication seminars, and presentation skills intensives. You can learn more about improving your presentation skills independently by checking out our free report available at https://www.boldnewdirections.com or at http://www.presentationtraininginstitute.com

 

 

Source url :
http://www.presentationtraininginstitute.com

Solution Focused Presentation Skills – Part 1 of 2

Ever struggled to engage your audience when giving a presentation?  Solution Focused presentations may be your answer!  Join us for this 2 part Series on How to Help Your Listeners

Generally speaking, professionals in your work world are busy people. More to the point, they have limited time and interest in other people’s problems. However, they do possess an unwavering interest in their own lives and predicaments. That said; if you want to engage an audience you need to identify the problem faced by your listeners and then go on to SOLVE it!! Moreover, you want to impress upon them that they can solve their own predicament by listening to your talk and following the steps you provide.

Solution focused speaking is an important tool in your communication tool box. By highlighting the pain or dilemma your listeners face you can then let them know that your presentation will provide key tools to assist them in resolving their own issue. One way to share your solution and how it applies to your listener is to outline your experience and how it applies to the audience by using the W4H1 Approach. This W4H1 approach has long been used by writers to convey information in a concise and organized manner. It involves utilizing a five-pronged explanatory approach by asking and answering five questions; these questions start with either a "W" or an "H". For example, look at questions that start with: What? Where? When? Why? & How? This combination of five helps you to provide a concise overview of your own experience.

For more information on how to communicate with your audience visit our website at https://www.boldnewdirections.com to find out about presentation skills training, communication seminars, and more!  Or join us at http://www.presentationtraininginstitute.com where you can download a free report on top tips to grow your communication skills.

Source url :
http://www.presentationtraininginstitute.com

Part 3 of 3 Part Series: Managing Organizational Change

In earlier articles we explored Steps 1 & 2 in helping your organization move effectively through organizational change.  Let’s take a closer look at Step 3.

Step 3: Clarify Roles That Fit The New Organization

Equally important to clarifying organizational vision, is clarifying individual vision. What should each staff member do to support the organization? How does their work support the overall vision? If significant shifts have occurred new teams and roles may need to be defined. Some roles may no longer be needed. The role clarification process can serve as a time of renewal as staff with key skill sets may be utilized in new ways. Bottom line, each member of the organization should be able to articulate how their work will support the overall vision of the company, and in turn, how they can support others in their staff team. Again, open and ongoing communication is essential as role clarification often occurs over time. While broad brush strokes are required immediately upon organizational change, details of roles may not get filled in for several months as the change unfolds within the organization. Savvy managers can create processes that enable staff and teams to discuss, shape and refine roles as time goes by.

By keeping these three steps in mind and involving staff teams in part step of the process, management teams can reduce confusion, uncertainty and helplessness. Moreover, by getting employees on board with the new vision, communicating regularly, and involving them in role clarification processes, organizations can optimize staff skillsets and organizational potential in changing times.

For more resources about management skills training, managing change, or free reports on building team effectiveness, visit our website at: http://www.managementtraininginstitute.com or learn about management training at https://www.boldnewdirections.com

Source url :
http://www.managementtraininginstitute.com

Using Management Skills During Organizational Change – Part 2 of 3 Part Series

The following three step approach to managing organizational change is a powerful tool. This series will explore the three steps for creating & sharing a new vision, keeping communication channels open, and clarifying roles for the new organization. The first step, of Creating & Sharing A Vision, was discussed in the last article. Let’s move on to step 2.

<br>

Step 2: Keep Communication Channels Open

Once the organizational vision has been communicated, management teams need to set up channels for ensuring ongoing two-way communication with teams and individuals. If staff meetings are already a valued communication strategy, ensure that they are regularly scheduled for weeks and even months after the organizational change is announced. Additionally, it will be valuable for managers to arrange for other communication opportunities including face to face meetings with staff, teleconference sessions, web conferences and more. Staff will have key insights about potential roadblocks to implementing the vision and these need to be considered and planned for in conjunction with team members. By being open to challenges, and also inviting staff to brainstorm solutions, management teams will gain support for implementing the new vision.

Watch for the next article in the series on Step 3 – Clarifying Roles For the New Organization. By keeping all three steps in mind and involving staff teams in part step of the process, management teams can reduce confusion, uncertainty and helplessness. Moreover, by getting employees on board with the new vision, communicating regularly, and involving them in role clarification processes, organizations can optimize staff skillsets and organizational potential in changing times.

For more resources about management skills training, managing change, or free reports on building team effectiveness, visit our website at http://www.managementtraininginstitute.com or learn about management training at https://www.boldnewdirections.com

 

Source url :
http://www.managementtraininginstitute.com

Effective Management During Organizational Change – Part 1 of 3 Part Series on Management Skills

3 Skills for Effective Management During Organizational Change

<br>

It is a rare company that has not weathered some type of organizational change. In fact in recent decades mergers and other forms of restructuring have become almost expected in large companies. However common, these types of organizational changes can lead to confusion, uncertainty and demoralization. By recognizing staff’s need for reassurance, information, and direction, a savvy management team can successfully navigate these potentially stormy times with skill and finesse. Make sure that your management team follows the three steps outlined below.  The following three step approach to managing organizational change is a powerful tool. This series includes 3 seperate articles on managing change: sharing a new vision, keeping communication channels open, and clarifying roles for the new organization.  Let’s get started with step one. 

<br>

Step 1. Create & Share A New Vision

It is imperative to create and convey a constructive vision of the change and how it will impact the entire organization. Depending upon the size of the company, visioning may occur at a board level, a management level, or (in an interactive fashion) with key staff members. The organizational culture may also define the type of input that is most effective for the visioning process. For example, top down organizations will clarify vision before sharing with staff whereas more consensus based organization’s (e.g. non-profits) will likely set up sessions for gathering and discussing staff input. While it is valuable to gain staff input and feedback, the main issue is often timeliness. When an organization is undergoing profound change, the sooner the new vision is communicated the better! Like a ship without a rudder, an organization without vision will soon flounder on the shoals. Savvy managers know the value of quickly agreeing upon organizational vision, stating it in understandable terms and sharing it via multiple forums. These forums can include meetings, teleconferences, emails, newsletters, and written collateral. Reinforcing the new vision during follow-up communications is essential as it may require multiple messages over time to help staff understand the new organization.

Watch for the next articles in this series to learn more about how to handle organizational change effectively. For more resources about management skills, managing change, or building team effectiveness, visit our website at: http://www.managementtraininginstitute.com or visit our partner site at https://www.boldnewdirections.com to look at management training options.

 

 

Source url :
http://www.managementtraininginstitute.com

Redirecting Your Negotiations – Part 3 in a 3 Part Series on Improving Negotiation Skills

Redirecting The Negotiations is an important skill set.

 Now that you’ve learned about tactics and how to determine their use, it’s helpful to learn how to redirect the negotiations back to positive ground.  This is part 3 in a 3 part series on How To Improve Your Negotiation Skills.

When you learn that the other party in your negotiation has been using a tactic against you need to tell the other party what the consequences are for dealing negatively.  Stay objective during this phase of negotiations if you can.  Judging the other party to be “wrong” may feel natural but all it will do is get their defenses up.   Just call it for what it is from an objective place. Take the lead in returning the negotiations to a mutuality-based, win-win process. Be the enlightened negotiator; be the model. That goes a long way in appearing powerful in a very positive way during any negotiation process.

Remember, test and probe with questions when you think someone is using tactics. Be the leader. Go for win-win! Visit us at http://www.negotiationstraininginstitute.com

Or look to our free resources at https://www.boldnewdirections.com to take your negotiations skills to the next level of success!

Improve Your Negotiation Skills By Discerning Tactics – Part 2 in a 3 Part Series

Uncovering a Tactic

 

If you suspect that a tactic is being used against you, the best strategy is to ask questions. It’s usually that simple in negotiations. You probe. You discuss. Let’s say the other party in your negotiation sets a deadline.  How can you determine if it’s a tactic or not? Test the deadline. Ask questions about it. Who set it? Why that time and date? What happens if the deadline is not met? In any negotiation it’s important to get conversational. Use objective criteria – the facts.  Alternatively if they say this is the last item for sale, ask about replacement items, possible shipping dates for new inventory.  Bottom line – determine if they were using scarcity as a tactic to pressure you during the negotiation.  Find out more at http://www.negotiationstraininginstitute.com

 

To Learn More About Uncovering Tactics

To learn more about uncovering tactics you can click here to go to  http://www.negotiationstraininginstitute.com   where you will find more information about negotiations plus a free report on How to Improve Your Negotiations.  Download the free report and improve your negotiation skills on the spot.  To learn about hosting an onsite negotiation skills training course please contact us at https://www.boldnewdirections.com or again visit http://www.negotiationstraininginstitute.com

 

 

About The Author Jim Hornickel

Jim Hornickel is the Director of Training at Negotiations Training Institute and CEO of Bold New Directions,  https://www.boldnewdirections.com ,  a transformational learning organization that offers corporate  learning programs including negotiations training, communications training, and presentation training.   Bold New Directions faculty work with Fortune 500 companies, mid-sized firms and educational institutions to grow people and performance. Find out more about Jim Hornickel and Bold New Directions at https://www.boldnewdirections.com or visit our specialized negotiations training site via http://www.negotiationstraininginstitute.com