Monthly Archives: July 2013

3 Skills for Effective Management During Organizational Change

It is a rare company that has not weathered some type of organizational change. In fact in recent decades mergers and other forms of restructuring have become almost expected in large companies. However common, these types of organizational changes can lead to confusion, uncertainty and demoralization. By recognizing staff’s need for reassurance, information, and direction, a savvy management team can successfully navigate these potentially stormy times with skill and finesse.

The following three step approach to managing organizational change is a powerful tool. This article will explore the three steps for creating & sharing a new vision, keeping communication channels open, and clarifying roles for the new organization.

 

Step 1. Create & Share A New Vision

It is imperative to create and convey a constructive vision of the change and how it will impact the entire organization. Depending upon the size of the company, visioning may occur at a board level, a management level, or (in an interactive fashion) with key staff members. The organizational culture may also define the type of input that is most effective for the visioning process. For example, top down organizations will clarify vision before sharing with staff whereas more consensus based organization’s (e.g. non-profits) will likely set up sessions for gathering and discussing staff input. While it is valuable to gain staff input and feedback, the main issue is often timeliness. When an organization is undergoing profound change, the sooner the new vision is communicated the better! Like a ship without a rudder, an organization without vision will soon flounder on the shoals. Savvy managers know the value of quickly agreeing upon organizational vision, stating it in understandable terms and sharing it via multiple forums. These forums can include meetings, teleconferences, emails, newsletters, and written collateral. Reinforcing the new vision during follow-up communications is essential as it may require multiple messages over time to help staff understand the new organization.

 

Step 2: Keep Communication Channels Open

Once the organizational vision has been communicated, management teams need to set up channels for ensuring ongoing two-way communication with teams and individuals. If staff meetings are already a valued communication strategy, ensure that they are regularly scheduled for weeks and even months after the organizational change is announced. Additionally, it will be valuable for managers to arrange for other communication opportunities including face to face meetings with staff, teleconference sessions, web conferences and more. Staff will have key insights about potential roadblocks to implementing the vision and these need to be considered and planned for in conjunction with team members. By being open to challenges, and also inviting staff to brainstorm solutions, management teams will gain support for implementing the new vision.

 

Step 3: Clarify Roles That Fit The New Organization

Equally important to clarifying organizational vision, is clarifying individual vision. What should each staff member do to support the organization? How does their work support the overall vision? If significant shifts have occurred new teams and roles may need to be defined. Some roles may no longer be needed. The role clarification process can serve as a time of renewal as staff with key skill sets may be utilized in new ways. Bottom line, each member of the organization should be able to articulate how their work will support the overall vision of the company, and in turn, how they can support others in their staff team. Again, open and ongoing communication is essential as role clarification often occurs over time. While broad brush strokes are required immediately upon organizational change, details of roles may not get filled in for several months as the change unfolds within the organization. Savvy managers can create processes that enable staff and teams to discuss, shape and refine roles as time goes by.

By keeping these three steps in mind and involving staff teams in part step of the process, management teams can reduce confusion, uncertainty and helplessness. Moreover, by getting employees on board with the new vision, communicating regularly, and involving them in role clarification processes, organizations can optimize staff skillsets and organizational potential in changing times.

For more resources about management skills training, managing change, or free reports on building team effectiveness, visit our website at: http://www.managementtraininginstitute.com today.  You can also visit us at our parent site https://www.boldnewdirections.com to see our book called Managing From The Inside Out: 16 Pathways to Build Positive Relationships With Staff.

 

 

 

Improve Presentation Skills With Solutions For Audience

Generally speaking, professionals in your work world are busy people. More to the point, they have limited time and interest in other people’s problems. However, they do possess an unwavering interest in their own lives and predicaments. That said; if you want to engage an audience you need to identify the problem faced by your listeners and then go on to SOLVE it!! Moreover, you want to impress upon them that they can solve their own predicament by listening to your presentation and following the steps you provide.

Solution focused speaking is an important asset in your communication tool box. By highlighting the pain or dilemma your listeners face you can then let them know that your presentation will provide key tools to assist them in resolving their own issue. One way to share your solution and how it applies to your listener is to outline your experience and how it applies to the audience by using the W4H1 Approach. This W4H1 approach has long been used by writers to convey information in a concise and organized manner. It involves utilizing a five-pronged explanatory approach by asking and answering five questions; these questions start with either a “W” or an “H”. For example, look at questions that start with: What? Where? When? Why? & How? This combination of five helps you to provide a concise overview of your own experience.

For example, let’s say that you were talking to a group of professionals who were concerned about upcoming layoffs. After first tapping into the pain and anguish this is undoubtedly producing in a group of staff, you could discuss how you successfully prepared for and transitioned through a lay off experience by starting your own consulting business. Let’s look at the W4H1 approach and how it would apply to this example of starting a consulting business. Notice that the questions are also written in an audience focused manner by dealing with what THEY can do, rather than a pure history of what YOU yourself did.

1. What Can You Do?

2. Where Can You Find Customers?

3. When Should You Start Your Business?

4. Why Promote Your Services?

5. How Can You Promote Your Services?

By answering each of these questions in a clear and concise manner you are directing your audience to solution oriented steps that they can take to resolve their issue. Your audience will thank you for not only connecting with their dilemma, but for explicitly helping them to understand a solution and take action!

For more information on how to communicate with your audience visit our websites at https://www.boldnewdirections.com or http://www.presentationtraininginstitute.com today to find out about presentation skills training, communication seminars, and free resources. Bold New Directions specializes in three critical areas of professional success: Leadership Skills, Communication Skills and Resilience Skills. Learn more about training options at Bold New Directions at https://www.boldnewdirections.com/ or http://www.presentationtraininginstitute.com

Part 5 – The Power of the WATNA in Negotiation Skills

Many people think that negotiating is difficult and full of underhanded tactics. In our experience, negotiations can be positive, productive and fun. This five part series uncovers the value of key elements in the negotiations process – specifically the negotiations range. You may ask “what is the range?” Many business professionals who negotiate in their jobs focus only on the monetary aspect when thinking about their range. However, there are many other elements that can be included such as service hours, warranties, extras, delivery times, percentages… Be creative! And, always think mutuality-based, win-win as these will deepen relationships so people want to work with you again.

There are five interactive areas that make up the range: the Wish, the Aspiration, the Bottom Line, the BATNA, and the WATNA. Earlier articles in the series focused on the power of the Wish, the Aspiration, the Bottom Line, and the BATNA. Read on to learn about the WATNA as it relates to the sale of a house.

Power of the WATNA:

WATNA stands for the Worst Alternative to a Negotiated Agreement. In the preparation phase of your negotiation, you need to consider what is the worst that will happen if you do not sell in a particular negotiation. Going to the worst case scenario in your negotiation preparation has a particular benefit: you might reconsider your bottom line. In negotiation skills, it is good to know what you would reconsider and the rationale. In this example of selling a home, you may need to sell your home by a certain deadline to relocate for a new job. Well, that limits your options in the particular negotiation. In this case, you might restructure your bottom line back to $350,000 or even lower to sell faster. WATNA is a very helpful tool to consider prior to entering into any negotiation as it helps you have more clarity and negotiation success.

How to Learn More:

Now that you have read all 5 parts of this series you are well on your way to negotiating success. Speaking of Negotiating Success, you can learn more about how to apply all five of these tools in our training session entitled Negotiating Success™. Or look for our soon-to-be published text book with the same name of Negotiating Success. You’ll be glad you did when you come out of your next negotiation more satisfied and financially ahead. For more information about negotiations skills or negotiations training courses please visit https://www.boldnewdirections.com or www.negotiationstraininginstitute.com today.

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About The Author:

Jim Hornickel is co-founder of Bold New Directions, a transformational learning company that works with companies to transform people and performance through training solutions including seminars, webinars, coaching and keynote events. Bold New Directions specializes in training solutions that build leadership skills, communication skills and resilience at work. Jim leads dynamic workshops that help professionals grow their negotiation skills. You can learn more about Jim Hornickel and the topic of Negotiations Training at Bold New Directions by visiting the company web site at www.boldnewdirections.com or at our negotiations training site www.negotiationstraininginstitute.com

Part 4 – The Power Of the BATNA in Negotiation Skills

Many people think that negotiating is filled with underhanded tactics and strategies. In reality negotiations can be a positive and productive process. This five part series uncovers the value of key elements in the negotiations process – specifically the negotiations range. You may ask “what is the range?” Many negotiators focus only on the monetary aspect when thinking about their range. We encourage using this same principle in any area in which concessions will be traded. In addition to a range for dollars, additional examples for application are: service hours included, delivery times, percentages… Be creative! And, always think mutuality-based, win-win.

There are five interactive areas that make up the range: the Wish, the Aspiration, the Bottom Line, the BATNA, and the WATNA. Earlier articles in the series focused on the power of the Wish, the Aspiration and the Bottom Line. Join us here in unraveling the complexity of the BATNA as it relates to the sale of a house.

Power of the BATNA:

BATNA stands for the Best Alternative to a Negotiated Agreement. The BATNA is useful when the negotiation has ended without a deal. In negotiations, the BATNA is the best guard you can have to never going past your Bottom Line. Why? Because when you negotiation with a BATNA you have alternatives. You have options. When you have alternatives in negotiations, you need not ever again feel pressured into going past what you said were your limits. You will negotiate knowing you can turn to your alternatives. (And the more alternatives the better). In this case, an alternative for the buyer is that he/she sells to someone else. Another is to be okay with keeping the house on the market longer.

How to Learn More:

Want to learn more about negotiation skills and the key elements of range? Stay tuned for part 5 of this series on creating range in your next round of negotiations. All five of these elements work together in ensuring masterful negotiation outcomes. Look for future articles regarding the other three elements to broaden your negotiations skills. Use all of the negotiation tools and you will be much more successful in getting what you want in negotiations (while ensuring other parties are happy too). For more information about negotiations skills or negotiations training courses please visit https://www.boldnewdirections.com or www.negotiationstraininginstitute.com today.

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About The Author:

Jim Hornickel is co-founder of Bold New Directions, a transformational learning company that works with companies to transform people and performance through training solutions including seminars, webinars, coaching and keynote events. Bold New Directions specializes in training solutions that build leadership skills, communication skills and resilience at work. Jim leads dynamic workshops that help professionals grow their negotiation skills. You can learn more about Jim Hornickel and the topic of Negotiations Training at Bold New Directions by visiting the company web site at www.boldnewdirections.com or at our negotiations training site www.negotiationstraininginstitute.com

The Power of Bottom Line in Negotiations

There are lots of areas of importance in a negotiation. This is part 3 in a five part series which focuses on the being clear about each of the five parts to creating and staying with an effective range. There are five interactive areas that make up the range: the Wish, the Aspiration, the Bottom Line, the BATNA, and the WATNA. See Parts 1 and 2 to learn about the Power of the Wish and Power of the Aspiration.

The Power of the Bottom Line:
The Bottom Line in negotiations is the least you will accept as a seller or the most you will pay as a buyer. I have asked hundreds of people in our Bold New Directions training programs if they have ever gone past their Bottom Line. 90% of people have in past negotiations. There is a reason it is called the Bottom Line. You have to do your prep work fully to know what your limits are prior to any negotiation. And if you have a limit, make sure it is your limit. In this case of negotiation, the limit is $335,000 from the seller’s perspective.

How to Learn More:
Want to learn more about negotiation skills and the key elements of range? Stay tuned for parts 4 and 5 of this series on creating range in your next negotiation. All five of these elements work together in successful negotiations. Look for future posts about the other three elements to broaden your negotiation skills. Use all of the negotiation tools and you will be much more successful in getting what you want in negotiations (while ensuring other parties are content too). For more information about negotiations skills or negotiations training courses please visit https://www.boldnewdirections.com or www.negotiationstraininginstitute.com today.

************************************************************************************

About The Author:
Jim Hornickel is co-founder of Bold New Directions, a transformational learning company that works with companies to transform people and performance through training solutions including seminars, webinars, coaching and keynote events. Bold New Directions specializes in training solutions that build leadership skills, communication skills and resilience at work. Jim leads dynamic workshops that help professionals grow their negotiation skills. You can learn more about Jim Hornickel and the topic of Negotiations Training at Bold New Directions by visiting the company web site at www.boldnewdirections.com or at our negotiations training site www.negotiationstraininginstitute.com