Monthly Archives: July 2013

Boost Your Projection – Part 4 in the Series on Vocal Variety in Presentations

Why Should You Boost Your Projection?

This aspect of voice is by far the most important as it correlates to your audience’s ability to hear your remarks. Even the most intelligent presenter can not have their desired impact if the people in the room can not hear their key points. With projection, everyone can hear your comments without having to strain their voice. However, there is still value in varying your projection to add intrigue and interest to your comments. For example, you might want to soften your voice to emphasize a key point and then later increase the volume for another point. In either case you must ensure that all members of the audience can hear each and every point.

Practice projecting your voice by imagining that everyone is sitting against the far wall in the room. Ensure they can hear you and that you are speaking from your diaphragm. In fact if you could only improve one skill in voice dynamics, we would say make it Projection.  The very act of speaking more loudly will change your breathing, slow your pace, and add more intonation – all great outcomes for your vocal variety.

 Now that we have discussed Projection keep on the look out for the next article in the series on how Personality impacts your vocals. Or, if you want additional information on how to hone your presentation skills visit our website to get a free copy of report on how to Master Your Presentation Skills at https://www.boldnewdirections.com or at http://www.presentationtraininginstitute.com

 

Add A Pause – Part 3 in the Series on Vocal Variety

The Power of The Pause

 

Learn how to stretch your voice by understanding the 5 P’s of Voice Control including Pitch, Pace, Pause, Projection & Personality.  This is part 3 in a 5 part series on vocal variety.

 

Pause – How It Works

Pause involves stopping momentarily for effect in the middle of your remarks. It is a tool that is used hand in hand with variation of Pace. A pause is best used before or after a significant point as a tool for emphasis. Pause is also a tremendous tool for nervous speakers who tend to speak too fast. By stopping at key points, the speaker allows the audience time to process key  ideas before moving on to new material. One easy trick to ensure you do pause is to underline key points in your notes and then place the word PAUSE in large letters to remind you to stop speaking for a few seconds. Actively playing with pause will have a profound effect on your presentation prowess.

 

Using the 5Ps of Vocal Control Together

When you’re just starting out you may want to focus on one P at a time then add in more until you are able to stretch your voice to reveal all 5 P’s in a given presentation. By playing around with each aspect of vocal control you can imbue your voice with interest, warmth, and personality! Utilize each of the P’s, including Pitch, Pace, Pause, Projection & Personality to actively engage your audience and keep them wanting more. If you want additional information on how to hone your presentation skills visit our website to get a free copy of report on how to Master Your Presentation Skills at https://www.boldnewdirections.com

 

 

 

 

Vary Pace for Vocal Variety – Part 2 of 5 Part Series

Vocal variety is essential to keeping your audience intrigued and interested in your remarks. This is Part 2 of a 5 Part Series on how you can you add emphasis, excitement and drama to your next presentation.  Vocal Variety involves 5 P’s.  Pitch, Pace, Pause, Projection and Personality.  In part 1 of this series we explored the power of Pitch.  Part 2 of this five part article drills down on how pacing impacts the listener in a professional presentation, speech, or set of remarks.  Pace is a wonderful tool that many presenters overlook.  Read below to learn how to vary your vocals with the power of pace. 

 

The Power of Pace in Presentations

Pace refers to the speed at which you speak. Just as monotone is boring so is mono-pace. A good speaker knows the value of changing the pace as they speak. For example, when you are introducing a topic that is exciting you may choose to speed up the pace of your voice. Let the audience know that something exciting is about to be shared in your next remarks.  On the other hand, when you want people to focus their attention on a more somber point, you may slow down for emphasis. Too fast all the time isn’t good, but neither is too slow all the time the way to go.  The overall point is that variation of pace is the key to success here. So play around with your pace next time you speak to see the impact on your audience.

Join us in the next article to learn about the power of the Pause in your next presentation.  Or visit us at http://www.presentationtraininginstitute.com or at https://www.boldnewdirections.com to download a free report on how to increase mastery in your presentation skills. 

5 P’s of Vocal Variety in Presentation Skills – Part 1 Pitch

5P’s of Voice Training & Presentation Skills – Part 1

Ever heard a boring speaker?  Wanted to walk way from the monotone sound of their voice? 

Voice is a powerful tool for presenters. Voice can make all the difference between success and failure when you’re aiming to engage your audience. In sales meetings, company updates or technical meetings, it is critical to keep your audience involved and interested in your remarks. Learn how to stretch your voice by understanding the 5 P’s of Voice Control including Pitch, Pace, Pause, Projection & Personality. 

This is the first of a five part series on how to add intrigue to your remarks by varying your voice dynamics.  Let’s get started with Pitch.

 

Pitch

Pitch refers to the ups and downs of your notes when you speak. We all have the ability to speak from a vocal range – which includes higher notes and lower notes. However, it takes great awareness and practice to notice your own pitch and to change it consciously. Why is pitch important? A monotone voice bores the audience and a bored audience is less likely to recall your key points or to take action. To play around with pitch try thinking of popular characters who have voices at either end of the vocal range then practice speaking (or singing!) like them. For example you might think of Michael Jackson’s high pitched voice and then compare it with Barry White’s deeper tones. You can also simulate the voices of movie actors to start expanding your own range. Over time your awareness and practice with pitch will enable you to vary your voice as you speak – all in the aim of drawing your audience into your remarks. Now that we’ve looked at Pitch, watch for Part 2 of the series when we will discuss Pace. In the meantime, if you want additional information on how to hone your presentation skills visit our website to get a free copy of report on how to Master Your Presentation Skills at https://www.boldnewdirections.com or at http://www.presentationtraininginstitute.com

 

3 Skills for Effective Management During Organizational Change

It is a rare company that has not weathered some type of organizational change. In fact in recent decades mergers and other forms of restructuring have become almost expected in large companies. However common, these types of organizational changes can lead to confusion, uncertainty and demoralization. By recognizing staff’s need for reassurance, information, and direction, a savvy management team can successfully navigate these potentially stormy times with skill and finesse.

The following three step approach to managing organizational change is a powerful tool. This article will explore the three steps for creating & sharing a new vision, keeping communication channels open, and clarifying roles for the new organization.

 

Step 1. Create & Share A New Vision

It is imperative to create and convey a constructive vision of the change and how it will impact the entire organization. Depending upon the size of the company, visioning may occur at a board level, a management level, or (in an interactive fashion) with key staff members. The organizational culture may also define the type of input that is most effective for the visioning process. For example, top down organizations will clarify vision before sharing with staff whereas more consensus based organization’s (e.g. non-profits) will likely set up sessions for gathering and discussing staff input. While it is valuable to gain staff input and feedback, the main issue is often timeliness. When an organization is undergoing profound change, the sooner the new vision is communicated the better! Like a ship without a rudder, an organization without vision will soon flounder on the shoals. Savvy managers know the value of quickly agreeing upon organizational vision, stating it in understandable terms and sharing it via multiple forums. These forums can include meetings, teleconferences, emails, newsletters, and written collateral. Reinforcing the new vision during follow-up communications is essential as it may require multiple messages over time to help staff understand the new organization.

 

Step 2: Keep Communication Channels Open

Once the organizational vision has been communicated, management teams need to set up channels for ensuring ongoing two-way communication with teams and individuals. If staff meetings are already a valued communication strategy, ensure that they are regularly scheduled for weeks and even months after the organizational change is announced. Additionally, it will be valuable for managers to arrange for other communication opportunities including face to face meetings with staff, teleconference sessions, web conferences and more. Staff will have key insights about potential roadblocks to implementing the vision and these need to be considered and planned for in conjunction with team members. By being open to challenges, and also inviting staff to brainstorm solutions, management teams will gain support for implementing the new vision.

 

Step 3: Clarify Roles That Fit The New Organization

Equally important to clarifying organizational vision, is clarifying individual vision. What should each staff member do to support the organization? How does their work support the overall vision? If significant shifts have occurred new teams and roles may need to be defined. Some roles may no longer be needed. The role clarification process can serve as a time of renewal as staff with key skill sets may be utilized in new ways. Bottom line, each member of the organization should be able to articulate how their work will support the overall vision of the company, and in turn, how they can support others in their staff team. Again, open and ongoing communication is essential as role clarification often occurs over time. While broad brush strokes are required immediately upon organizational change, details of roles may not get filled in for several months as the change unfolds within the organization. Savvy managers can create processes that enable staff and teams to discuss, shape and refine roles as time goes by.

By keeping these three steps in mind and involving staff teams in part step of the process, management teams can reduce confusion, uncertainty and helplessness. Moreover, by getting employees on board with the new vision, communicating regularly, and involving them in role clarification processes, organizations can optimize staff skillsets and organizational potential in changing times.

For more resources about management skills training, managing change, or free reports on building team effectiveness, visit our website at: http://www.managementtraininginstitute.com today.  You can also visit us at our parent site https://www.boldnewdirections.com to see our book called Managing From The Inside Out: 16 Pathways to Build Positive Relationships With Staff.

 

 

 

Improve Presentation Skills With Solutions For Audience

Generally speaking, professionals in your work world are busy people. More to the point, they have limited time and interest in other people’s problems. However, they do possess an unwavering interest in their own lives and predicaments. That said; if you want to engage an audience you need to identify the problem faced by your listeners and then go on to SOLVE it!! Moreover, you want to impress upon them that they can solve their own predicament by listening to your presentation and following the steps you provide.

Solution focused speaking is an important asset in your communication tool box. By highlighting the pain or dilemma your listeners face you can then let them know that your presentation will provide key tools to assist them in resolving their own issue. One way to share your solution and how it applies to your listener is to outline your experience and how it applies to the audience by using the W4H1 Approach. This W4H1 approach has long been used by writers to convey information in a concise and organized manner. It involves utilizing a five-pronged explanatory approach by asking and answering five questions; these questions start with either a “W” or an “H”. For example, look at questions that start with: What? Where? When? Why? & How? This combination of five helps you to provide a concise overview of your own experience.

For example, let’s say that you were talking to a group of professionals who were concerned about upcoming layoffs. After first tapping into the pain and anguish this is undoubtedly producing in a group of staff, you could discuss how you successfully prepared for and transitioned through a lay off experience by starting your own consulting business. Let’s look at the W4H1 approach and how it would apply to this example of starting a consulting business. Notice that the questions are also written in an audience focused manner by dealing with what THEY can do, rather than a pure history of what YOU yourself did.

1. What Can You Do?

2. Where Can You Find Customers?

3. When Should You Start Your Business?

4. Why Promote Your Services?

5. How Can You Promote Your Services?

By answering each of these questions in a clear and concise manner you are directing your audience to solution oriented steps that they can take to resolve their issue. Your audience will thank you for not only connecting with their dilemma, but for explicitly helping them to understand a solution and take action!

For more information on how to communicate with your audience visit our websites at https://www.boldnewdirections.com or http://www.presentationtraininginstitute.com today to find out about presentation skills training, communication seminars, and free resources. Bold New Directions specializes in three critical areas of professional success: Leadership Skills, Communication Skills and Resilience Skills. Learn more about training options at Bold New Directions at https://www.boldnewdirections.com/ or http://www.presentationtraininginstitute.com

Part 5 – The Power of the WATNA in Negotiation Skills

Many people think that negotiating is difficult and full of underhanded tactics. In our experience, negotiations can be positive, productive and fun. This five part series uncovers the value of key elements in the negotiations process – specifically the negotiations range. You may ask “what is the range?” Many business professionals who negotiate in their jobs focus only on the monetary aspect when thinking about their range. However, there are many other elements that can be included such as service hours, warranties, extras, delivery times, percentages… Be creative! And, always think mutuality-based, win-win as these will deepen relationships so people want to work with you again.

There are five interactive areas that make up the range: the Wish, the Aspiration, the Bottom Line, the BATNA, and the WATNA. Earlier articles in the series focused on the power of the Wish, the Aspiration, the Bottom Line, and the BATNA. Read on to learn about the WATNA as it relates to the sale of a house.

Power of the WATNA:

WATNA stands for the Worst Alternative to a Negotiated Agreement. In the preparation phase of your negotiation, you need to consider what is the worst that will happen if you do not sell in a particular negotiation. Going to the worst case scenario in your negotiation preparation has a particular benefit: you might reconsider your bottom line. In negotiation skills, it is good to know what you would reconsider and the rationale. In this example of selling a home, you may need to sell your home by a certain deadline to relocate for a new job. Well, that limits your options in the particular negotiation. In this case, you might restructure your bottom line back to $350,000 or even lower to sell faster. WATNA is a very helpful tool to consider prior to entering into any negotiation as it helps you have more clarity and negotiation success.

How to Learn More:

Now that you have read all 5 parts of this series you are well on your way to negotiating success. Speaking of Negotiating Success, you can learn more about how to apply all five of these tools in our training session entitled Negotiating Success™. Or look for our soon-to-be published text book with the same name of Negotiating Success. You’ll be glad you did when you come out of your next negotiation more satisfied and financially ahead. For more information about negotiations skills or negotiations training courses please visit https://www.boldnewdirections.com or www.negotiationstraininginstitute.com today.

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About The Author:

Jim Hornickel is co-founder of Bold New Directions, a transformational learning company that works with companies to transform people and performance through training solutions including seminars, webinars, coaching and keynote events. Bold New Directions specializes in training solutions that build leadership skills, communication skills and resilience at work. Jim leads dynamic workshops that help professionals grow their negotiation skills. You can learn more about Jim Hornickel and the topic of Negotiations Training at Bold New Directions by visiting the company web site at www.boldnewdirections.com or at our negotiations training site www.negotiationstraininginstitute.com

Part 4 – The Power Of the BATNA in Negotiation Skills

Many people think that negotiating is filled with underhanded tactics and strategies. In reality negotiations can be a positive and productive process. This five part series uncovers the value of key elements in the negotiations process – specifically the negotiations range. You may ask “what is the range?” Many negotiators focus only on the monetary aspect when thinking about their range. We encourage using this same principle in any area in which concessions will be traded. In addition to a range for dollars, additional examples for application are: service hours included, delivery times, percentages… Be creative! And, always think mutuality-based, win-win.

There are five interactive areas that make up the range: the Wish, the Aspiration, the Bottom Line, the BATNA, and the WATNA. Earlier articles in the series focused on the power of the Wish, the Aspiration and the Bottom Line. Join us here in unraveling the complexity of the BATNA as it relates to the sale of a house.

Power of the BATNA:

BATNA stands for the Best Alternative to a Negotiated Agreement. The BATNA is useful when the negotiation has ended without a deal. In negotiations, the BATNA is the best guard you can have to never going past your Bottom Line. Why? Because when you negotiation with a BATNA you have alternatives. You have options. When you have alternatives in negotiations, you need not ever again feel pressured into going past what you said were your limits. You will negotiate knowing you can turn to your alternatives. (And the more alternatives the better). In this case, an alternative for the buyer is that he/she sells to someone else. Another is to be okay with keeping the house on the market longer.

How to Learn More:

Want to learn more about negotiation skills and the key elements of range? Stay tuned for part 5 of this series on creating range in your next round of negotiations. All five of these elements work together in ensuring masterful negotiation outcomes. Look for future articles regarding the other three elements to broaden your negotiations skills. Use all of the negotiation tools and you will be much more successful in getting what you want in negotiations (while ensuring other parties are happy too). For more information about negotiations skills or negotiations training courses please visit https://www.boldnewdirections.com or www.negotiationstraininginstitute.com today.

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About The Author:

Jim Hornickel is co-founder of Bold New Directions, a transformational learning company that works with companies to transform people and performance through training solutions including seminars, webinars, coaching and keynote events. Bold New Directions specializes in training solutions that build leadership skills, communication skills and resilience at work. Jim leads dynamic workshops that help professionals grow their negotiation skills. You can learn more about Jim Hornickel and the topic of Negotiations Training at Bold New Directions by visiting the company web site at www.boldnewdirections.com or at our negotiations training site www.negotiationstraininginstitute.com

The Power of Bottom Line in Negotiations

There are lots of areas of importance in a negotiation. This is part 3 in a five part series which focuses on the being clear about each of the five parts to creating and staying with an effective range. There are five interactive areas that make up the range: the Wish, the Aspiration, the Bottom Line, the BATNA, and the WATNA. See Parts 1 and 2 to learn about the Power of the Wish and Power of the Aspiration.

The Power of the Bottom Line:
The Bottom Line in negotiations is the least you will accept as a seller or the most you will pay as a buyer. I have asked hundreds of people in our Bold New Directions training programs if they have ever gone past their Bottom Line. 90% of people have in past negotiations. There is a reason it is called the Bottom Line. You have to do your prep work fully to know what your limits are prior to any negotiation. And if you have a limit, make sure it is your limit. In this case of negotiation, the limit is $335,000 from the seller’s perspective.

How to Learn More:
Want to learn more about negotiation skills and the key elements of range? Stay tuned for parts 4 and 5 of this series on creating range in your next negotiation. All five of these elements work together in successful negotiations. Look for future posts about the other three elements to broaden your negotiation skills. Use all of the negotiation tools and you will be much more successful in getting what you want in negotiations (while ensuring other parties are content too). For more information about negotiations skills or negotiations training courses please visit https://www.boldnewdirections.com or www.negotiationstraininginstitute.com today.

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About The Author:
Jim Hornickel is co-founder of Bold New Directions, a transformational learning company that works with companies to transform people and performance through training solutions including seminars, webinars, coaching and keynote events. Bold New Directions specializes in training solutions that build leadership skills, communication skills and resilience at work. Jim leads dynamic workshops that help professionals grow their negotiation skills. You can learn more about Jim Hornickel and the topic of Negotiations Training at Bold New Directions by visiting the company web site at www.boldnewdirections.com or at our negotiations training site www.negotiationstraininginstitute.com